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Wm Foster & Co, Wellington Foundry
From: Helen Casey Tue 14 Jul 2009 10:49
 
I hope this isn't too far off-topic but it concerns a Lincoln company who, among other things, built traction engines, so maybe you'll let me get away with it! I'm looking for some information from any members who live in Lincoln and might be able to help.

It's regarding the site of the former Wm Foster & Co's Wellington Foundry which used, until the 1960s, to occupy land between Waterloo Street and Firth Road. This land is now part of the Tritton Road retail centre with only a short stretch of Waterloo Road remaining.

What I'm trying to find out is: does any part of the former Fosters' buildings remain on the site? There are some industrial buildings on the SW side of the site, adjacent to the river but these were Rustons'. Does anybody know if they always belonged to Rustons or did they, at some time, form part of Fosters' complex?

If anyone has the definitive answer, I'd be grateful if they could post it here. The only alternative is a shopping trip to do some exploration and Tritton Road's a long way from Essex!

Thanks, in advance, for any assistance you can supply.
Wm Foster & Co, Wellington Foundry
From: Con-Rod Editor (--@--.--) Wed 28 Oct 2009 18:18
 
Helen,

Haven't got any information at the moment about the site of the foundry. However i will look into when i can. A book about the Wellington Foundry was published in 1997 - i've reserved a copy from Lincolnshire Libraries.

Regards,
Andy

The story of the Wellington Foundry, Lincoln
a history of William Foster & Co. Ltd
by Michael R. Lane
Published in 1997, Unicorn Press (London)
Language: English
Pagination: viii, 192 p. :
ISBN 10: 0906290155
Dewey: 338.762110942534
LC: HD9705.G74 W455 1997
Subject: Wellington Foundry (Lincoln, England) History.
Wm Foster & Co, Wellington Foundry
From: Helen Casey Sun 8 Nov 2009 19:59
 
Sorry, Andy, I've only just seen this message. Thanks for your help - you're a star!! I'll drop into my library this week and see if they can lay hands on the book.

So far, I've had no response at all from the Industrial Archeological Society and planned to contact the Museum of Lincolnshire Life when I get a moment but this is a great help. I'd planned to go and have a wander around the retail park myself last week (no, not shopping) to see what I could spot but, alas, a flat battery stopped me getting there.

I'm hoping to persuade the Transport Trust that the Tritton Road site merits one of their Red Wheels as a site of unique transport historical interest. Currently, the official view is that a site can't have a Red Wheel plaque if there's nothing to fix it to!
Best wishes,
Helen
Wm Foster & Co, Wellington Foundry
From: derek.broughton Sat 9 Jan 2010 13:55
 
hello
re fosters works
regret only piece now remaining is not very inspirational!
go along tritton road in lincoln out of town along the cycle track until you are in front of starbucks coffee shop on the east side of the road .
look towards starbucks and you will see to the right of starbucks a tall wall seperating starbucks from the gardens of the row of terrace houses to the right-the wall is the only piece remaing
whole site was owned by allen gwynnes (successors to fosters/foster gwynnes until closed down in 1968).site
was then purchased and used for a few years in early 1970's
by ruston-bucyrus,but then demolished to create the presesnt day shopping mall
only other surving relic is possibly the stone sign from the factory front which was rescued when site demolished and now is on show at museum of lincolnshire life burton road in lincoln
hope this helps!
derek broughton
museum of lincolnshire life
Wm Foster & Co, Wellington Foundry
From: Helen Casey Mon 11 Jan 2010 18:44
 
Thank you, Derek!

This is exactly what I needed to know and your information will be passed on to the Red Wheel organisers at the Transport Trust very shortly.

Best wishes,
Helen.

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